The Blue Lagoon is one of Iceland’s top tourist attractions.  A geothermal spa where you can relax and wash away your sins (we visited the day after St Patrick’s day, so plenty of sins to wash away), the Blue Lagoon combines both science and the wonders of nature.  Accidentally created (yes you read that correctly, accidentally) back in 1976, the lagoon is a man made by product of the boiling waters from the Icelandic lava fields, and the Svartsengi power plant.  The power plant uses the water from the lava fields to create heat and energy, then once done with the water it pumps it into the lagoon.  The water is clean, no need to worry about that, but more importantly its also good for you.  Laced with minerals such as silica and sulpher, the cossy warm waters of around 40C are said to be very very good for bad skin conditions. A range of treatments are also available at the Blue Lagoon centre, but most people just choose to bath in the warm blue waters and smear silica all over their faces to form an energizing face pack.

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

So why am I harping on about the Blue Lagoon, its been done before I know.  Every blogger worth their salt has been to Iceland recently, and with good cause as its a stunningly beautiful place!  Well, most of those bloggers went for at least a week, whereas as the Mrs and I went for just a long weekend due to work related time constraints.  As such we wanted to cram in as much as possible over our 3 night stay.  Naturally we would lose time travelling to and from Iceland, and originally it has looked that our last day there (Monday) would include simply getting from our apartment to the airport.  A simple transit day.

Usually transit days suck!  You either have to leave your accommodation in the early hours, or you have ages to wait around after you are made to check out.  Its very rare that you have a win in the situation.  In Iceland however they seem to have a very near perfect solution.  En route to or from the Keflavik International Airport in the South West of Iceland, visitors to this glorious part of the world can now add a bit of excitement to their transit days by visiting the Blue Lagoon.  It makes sense after all, the Blue Lagoon is positioned nicely between the airport and Reykjavik, the capital city and most likely starting point for visitors.

From Reykjavik to Keflavik via the Blue Lagoon

We booked our Reykjavik to Keflavik via the Blue Lagoon bus for just £20 each through getyourguide.com.  It didn’t include the entrance to the Blue Lagoon which is an extra £30 ish, but it did include looking after our luggage whilst we went into the Lagoon, saving us the cost of having to hire a large storage locker once inside.  Before that point however the bus had picked us up directly outside our apartment, and once finished at the Blue Lagoon it dropped us directly at the airport.  There was literally no fuss, we were amazed.  Naturally not everyones flights all leave at the same time, so there are a range or times from whish you can be picked up, and another range of times that you can be picked up from the lagoon and dropped at the airport.  Its recommended you arrive at the airport 2 hours before you flight, so we chose to be picked up from our apartment at 9am, reaching the Blue Lagoon for 10am.  We then spent 2 hours in and around the lagoon complex before getting our second bus at 12 noon and reaching the airport shortly before 12.30.  We were there in plenty of time for our 2.3opm flight.  Here’s the range …

Pick up from acccommodation times Leave lagoon for airport times
9am 12 noon
11am 3pm
1pm 5.15pm
4.15pm 7pm
6.15pm 9pm

… these are obviously subject to change, and bear in mind that it takes around 45 minutes from Reykjavik to the Blue Lagoon, and another 20 minutes from the Blue Lagoon to Keflavik airport.

The Blue Lagoon

Once in the Blue Lagoon, we showered (naked) and changed before descending upon the pool of blue.  We chose to enter the lagoon via a small acclimatization pool which had a door leading out to the main attraction   Others chose the braver option and walked outside into the cold before taking the plunge.

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

The lagoon itself is very shallow, you have to get down quite low to make sure your shoulders are covered and not exposed to the cold.  The water is perfect though and you feel instantly calm and relaxed.  Boxes of silica surround the pool, refreshingly its free to take some and make your own face mask.  I’m not normally one for spa treatments, but even I indulged in a little face mask … god knows I needed it after being abusing my body with nothing but cold conditions and junk food throughout March.   We found just over an hour to be enough time in the lagoon, but that said we didn’t purchase any of the extras on offer, there are all sorts of treatments and therapy’s on offer here.

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

Bluelagoon9

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

The Blue Lagoon, Iceland

Conclusion

I overhead a lady on our bus to the Blue Lagoon saying that she could never go straight to the airport after swimming in the lagoon (she was obviously not going onto the airport, but back to Reykjavik once finished), but I cant understand why not.  If its simply that you’ll have wet clothes in your luggage, take a wet bag with you, problem solved.  In my opinion this was one of the best ways to get to an airport, not just in the sense that you make something of a day that would usually involving waiting around, but also because you’re fresh.  You shower an hour before you get on a plane, that’s awesome!  I hate travel days where you have to do hours/days between showers.

What I’m saying is, this bus/tour if you have flights that allow for it, is a great way to spend a transit day and a great way to save time whilst in Iceland.  Thumbs up from me.